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Democrats and the mainstream media have been running around screaming that America needs more gun control in order to stop school and mass shootings. They want to raise the age for gun purchases, increase or tighten firearm background checks, ban certain firearms and firearm accessories and prevent more people from being able to purchase, own or be in possession of a firearm. A growing number of Democrats and members of the mainstream media are calling for a complete ban of the private ownership of all firearms.

They claim this is the only way to stop the senseless violence.

If their logic is true, then one would think that there should not be any bombings in the United States, since they have been banned for many years, but the news from Austin, Texas shows that it’s not the case. However, the bombs in Austin are not the only incidents of illegal bombings in the US. Take a look at some of the bombings that have taken place in just my lifetime:

  • 1951-56: George Metesky, a former Consolidated Edison employee with a grudge against the company, sets off a series of blasts at New York landmarks, including Grand Central station and Radio City Music Hall. No one is killed. Known as The Mad Bomber, Metesky spends 16 years in a mental hospital.
  • March 6, 1970: Three members of the revolutionary Weather Underground accidentally blow themselves up in their townhouse in New York City’s Greenwich Village while making bombs.
  • March 1, 1971: The Senate wing of the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C., is bombed by the Weather Underground. No one is killed.
  • 27, 1972: A bomb wrecks the New York City office of impresario Sol Hurok, who had been booking Soviet artists. One person is killed and nine are injured, Hurok among them. A caller claiming to represent Soviet Jews claims responsibility, but no arrests are made
  • 24, 1975: A bomb goes off at historic Fraunces Tavern in New York City, killing four people. It was one of 49 bombings attributed to the Puerto Rican nationalist group FALN between 1974 and 1977 in New York.
  • 29, 1975: The U.S. State Department building in Washington, D.C., is bombed by the Weather Underground. No one is killed.
  • 29, 1975: A bomb hidden in a locker explodes at the TWA terminal at New York’s LaGuardia Airport, killing 11 people and injuring 75. Palestinian, Puerto Rican and Croatian groups are suspected, but no arrests are made
  • May 16, 1981: A bomb explodes in a men’s bathroom at the Pan Am terminal at New York’s Kennedy Airport, killing a man. A group calling itself the Puerto Rican Armed Resistance claims responsibility. No arrests are made.
  • 7, 1983: A bomb blows a hole in a wall outside the Senate chamber at the Capitol in Washington. No one is hurt. Two leftist radicals plead guilty.
  • 26, 1993: A bomb in a van explodes in the underground World Trade Center garage in New York City, killing six people and injuring more than 1,000. Five Muslims are eventually convicted of the crime
  • April 19, 1995: A car bomb parked outside the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City kills 168 people and injures more than 500. It is the deadliest U.S. bombing in 75 years. Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols are convicted. McVeigh is executed in 2001 and Nichols is sentenced to life in prison.
  • July 27, 1996: A bomb explodes at Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta during the Summer Games, killing two people and injuring more than 100. Eric Robert Rudolph is arrested in 2003. He pleads guilty and is sentenced to life in prison.
  • 20, 1998: A bombing at an abortion clinic in Birmingham, Ala., kills one guard and injures a nurse. Eric Robert Rudolph is suspected in the case.
  • Jan 22, 1998: Theodore Kaczynski pleads guilty in Sacramento, Calif., to being the Unabomber in return for a sentence of life in prison without parole. He’s locked up in the federal Supermax prison in Colorado for killing three people and injuring 23 during a nationwide bombing spree between 1978 and 1995.
  • 11, 2001: Four commercial jets are hijacked by 19 al-Qaida militants and used as suicide bombs, bringing down the two towers of New York City’s World Trade Center and crashing into the Pentagon. Nearly 3,000 people are killed in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania.
  • 25, 2009: The so-called “underwear bomber,” Nigerian Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, is subdued by passengers and crew after trying to blow up an airliner heading from Paris to Detroit using explosives hidden in his undergarments. He’s sentenced to life in prison.
  • May 1, 2010: Pakistani immigrant Faisal Shahzad leaves an explosives-laden SUV in New York’s Times Square, hoping to detonate it on a busy night. Street vendors spot smoke coming from the vehicle and the bomb is disabled. Shahzad is arrested as he tries to leave the country and is sentenced to life in prison.
  • 17, 2011: A backpack bomb is placed along a Martin Luther King Day parade route in Spokane, Wash., meant to kill and injure participants in a civil rights march, but is found and disabled before it can explode. White supremacist Kevin Harpham is convicted and sentenced to 32 years in federal prison.
  • April 15, 2013: Two bombs explode in the packed streets near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, killing two people and injuring more than 80.

Obviously, outlawing bombs has not been that successful in stopping them from exploding here in the US. Perhaps Congress needs to pass bills that set age limits and background checks for every item that can be used to build a bomb – common wiring, plumbing pipes, electrical tape, garden fertilizers, cell phones, cardboard boxes, pressure cookers and more. If this sounds preposterous, it is and it’s just as preposterous as many of the ideas for gun control that have been bantered around in local, state governments and in Congress.

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