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In the summer of 1937, during the early years of Japanese occupation of parts of the Pacific region, famed female aviator Amelia Earhart set off on an around-the-world journey in her airplane. The longest and perhaps most dangerous leg of her journey was the 2,500-mile flight from Papua New Guinea to Howland Island in the Pacific Ocean.

On July 2, Earhart and her plane disappeared, launching a host of theories of what might have happened to the woman who seemed to not know fear.

A famed anthropology professor at the University of Tennessee, says he is 99% positive that the bones discovered on a remote Pacific Island in 1940 are the remains of Earhart.

(The Daily Wire) – It’s a mystery that has captivated the world since famed aviator Amelia Earhart disappeared on July 2, 1937.

On the longest leg of her around-the-world flight, from Papua New Guinea to Howland Island, a trip of 2,556 miles, Earhart suddenly disappeared. Speculation and conspiracy theories abounded: She landed safely on a remote island, she was captured by the Japanese, even that she turned back and assumed another identity.

A new scientific study now claims to have solved the enduring mystery of what happened to her. A scientist has concluded that bones found nearly 80 years ago on a remote Pacific island are almost definitely those of Earhart…

The remains were discovered on a tiny island of Nikumaroro, which is about 2,600 due west of Papua New Guinea and about 400 miles south of Howland Island. Professor Richard Jantz says they used bone measurements to determine that the remains are those of Amelia Earhart, but those measurements were taken in 1941 and the bones have since been lost, adding to the mystery that has lasted for 80 years.

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