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There is a distinct difference between the way employers treat Christian employees and employees of other religions. It’s been happening for many years and is still happening and the Trump administration is continuing the practice.

Some years back, I worked for a utility that is only two such utilities that was established by the federal government, but run as a private company, with state oversight. In fact, the utility was started with help of President Theodore Roosevelt and it began with company building a hydroelectric dam for generating electricity and the company maintained a series of dams for flood control and to provide water for agriculture. The vehicles we drove all had state government license plates.

During the time I was there, we were all informed that a new policy has been issued that banned all religious symbolism from the workplace. No one was allowed to have a Bible visible at their work station. Even secretaries that had picture of kids and family with the frames containing a Bible verse, had to be removed. Women were told they could not even wear any form of jewelry that had a cross or Star of David.

However, it soon became obvious that the policy only applied to Christians and Jews, but not to other religions. A member of upper management was a Sikh and no one dared make him remove his turban or other religious symbols.

The hypocrisy of religious discrimination in the work place continues to this day. Many Christian employees in numerous businesses are told they can’t wear their jewelry, can’t wear clothing with any religious symbol, nor are they allowed to have a Bible or Christian photos, posters or artwork at their work stations. I’ve heard of some who were ordered to remove them because others in the workplace claimed they were offensive and represented intolerance or face disciplinary action that could include demotion or termination. No one came to the legal rescue of the Christian employees.

However, if the employee is a Muslim, that’s an entirely different matter and the Trump administration’s EEOC has been working to help protect Muslim employees, where they usually don’t protect Christian employees, as in the case of a man named William Webb, as reported by Judicial Watch:

“Keeping with an Obama practice of pursuing American businesses that won’t accommodate Muslims, the Trump administration sued a security company for refusing to modify its grooming standards. This constituted religious discrimination, according to the government, because the Muslim employee requested the grooming exemption in accordance with his ‘sincerely held religious beliefs.’ In a settlement reached this month between the company and the government, the security guard gets $90,000 in damages and the firm must hire an equal employment monitor and revise its religious accommodation policies.”

The alleged difference is that the Muslim claimed that his grooming was for is deep Muslim faith, while it seems many employers and the government don’t believe that having a Bible present or wearing a cross is due to ‘sincerely held religious beliefs’. The problem is that most Christians give into the discriminatory demands of their employer to keep their job and because they believe they should be submissive to the authority place over them, as detailed in 1 Peter 3:8-22.

The problem is that no one is afraid of Christians or Jews, but they tend to be afraid of offending Muslims, hence, Muslims get government protection, but not Christians and Jews.

If Muslims are allowed special treatment or consideration in the workplace due to their religion, then should not Christians and Jews also receive the same equal treatment or consideration for their religion?

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