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Over the past year, ESPN has fallen from its once lofty pedestal as the sports news giant. They have been rocked with several scandals concerning racist reporters and sagging ratings. Twice this year, ESPN has announced layoffs. The plummeting NFL attendance and ratings hasn’t helped ESPN either, even though they don’t broadcast most games. A number of the ESPN programs center around the NFL and season and if fans aren’t watch or attending football games, they’re also not watching ESPN programs.

However, that is not the reason that John Skipper, the president of ESPN is resigning. He claims it is due to substance abuse problems.

(Fox News) – ESPN President John Skipper announced Monday he is resigning from the network due to a substance addiction problem.

“I have struggled for many years with a substance addiction. I have decided that the most important thing I can do right now is to take care of my problem,” Skipper said in a statement.

Skipper said he and the company have “mutually agreed” it was appropriate for him to resign.

“I come to this public disclosure with embarrassment, trepidation and a feeling of having let others I care about down,” Skipper’s statement continued. “As I deal with this issue and what it means to me and my family, I ask for appropriate privacy and a little understanding.” …

One can’t help but wonder if part of the reason Skipper is struggling with substance abuse is related to the rapid decline of ESPN?

In the interim, former ESPN President George Bodenheimer will be acting president for the next 90-days until a new president can be named according to ESPN’s parent company (Walt Disney) CEO Bob Iger. Skipper has served as president of ESPN since 2012, after joining the company in 1997.

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