Senate Dems Want Sessions and Trump to Testify

Senate Democrats did not get the smoking-gun testimony from James Comey last week, that they were hoping for. They were counting on Comey providing them with the evidence to oust Trump from the White House, but it didn’t happen. Now they want to question President Donald Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Sessions says he will testify and answer questions, but Trump has yet to respond.

Senate Democrats are looking to intensify the Russia-related investigations on Capitol Hill despite a call from Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel to abandon the “collusion” track for lack of evidence – with plans to grill Attorney General Jeff Sessions and even a bid to get President Trump under oath.

While Trump has not responded to the invitation, Sessions already has agreed to answer questions Tuesday before the Senate Intelligence Committee in the probe of Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential race. Presuming that hearing goes forward, the big question is whether Sessions will testify in public – and in doing so, drive the same kind of media frenzy that surrounded fired FBI Director James Comey’s testimony this past Thursday.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said Sunday he wants Sessions speaking in public and under oath…

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It’s rare for a sitting President to testify before any congressional committee. Some of have used executive privilege to avoid testifying in the past, but Trump has not indicated what he will do. If he doesn’t testify, then they will automatically charge that he has something to hide. If he does testify, it is sure to be a lot more vicious than some of the Democrats were with Comey.

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