Please disable your Ad Blocker to better interact with this website.

Texas Governor Greg Abbott is a staunch pro-lifer and most people expect him to sign the extensive anti-abortion bill passed by the Republican-controlled Senate. Among the bill’s many features is and probably the most controversial, is the banning of ‘dilation and evacuation’ abortions, the most common method used during the second trimester. This is the method where doctors use medical equipment to rip a baby to pieces and extract the pieces.

Texas senators voted Friday to send a bill banning the most common second-trimester abortion procedure and changing how health care facilities handle fetal remains to Gov. Greg Abbott’s desk.   

Texas senators voted Friday to send a bill banning the most common second-trimester abortion procedure and changing how health care facilities handle fetal remains to Gov. Greg Abbott’s desk. 

Under Senate Bill 8, which passed 22-9, health care facilities including hospitals and abortion clinics would be required to bury or cremate any fetal remains — whether from abortion, miscarriage or stillbirth. The bill would also ban facilities from donating aborted fetal tissue to medical researchers, and aims to outlaw “partial-birth abortions,” which are already illegal under federal law…

The ‘dilation and evacuation’ is started when the baby is still alive and able to feel the pain of having its legs and arms torn from its tiny body, until the baby dies and the rest of its remains are removed from the womb. I have always contented that people who advocate and perform this kind of abortion should have it done to them. Perhaps it would put an end to the tortuous murdering of innocent children.

READ MORE HERE

 

GET MORE STORIES LIKE THIS

IN YOUR INBOX!

Sign up for our daily email and get the stories everyone is talking about.

 

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.

GET MORE STORIES LIKE THIS

IN YOUR INBOX!

Sign up for our daily email and get the stories everyone is talking about.