Mass Spying and Hole in Constitution

Judge Andrew Napolitano spent 8 years on the New Jersey Superior Court. Now he serves as a legal and judicial analyst for Fox News. He shares a unique view of the ongoing issues of mass spying and the problems with the US Constitution.

The issue of federal government surveillance of Americans has largely occupied Washington politicians and the media since President Donald Trump first accused the administration of his predecessor of spying on him while he and his colleagues worked at Trump Tower in New York City during the presidential election campaign and during the presidential transition.

Trump’s allegations were initially dismissed as a diversionary tactic to get the attention of the media and the interest of the public off allegations made against the Trump campaign that it conspired with agents of Russian intelligence to facilitate Russian interference with the presidential election. Even some very smart colleagues of mine dismissed Trump’s allegations, arguing that no one in Washington found them believable.

Then the director of the FBI, James Comey, and the director of the National Security Agency, America’s 60,000-person-strong domestic spying apparatus, Adm. Mike Rogers, testified under oath that they knew of no surveillance of candidate or President-elect Trump at Trump Tower.

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