Ethnicity’s Role in Heart Disease, Strokes and Diabetes

Over the past 8 years, there has been a lot in the news about race and racism. With Barack Obama’s encouragements, many black activists looked for racism everywhere and if they couldn’t find any, they created some. Many of them kept saying they wanted equality and not discrimination, but in the end, they were after preferential treatment, just like other minority groups (LGBT and illegal aliens) had been given. While I don’t believe in different races, there are some medical differences associated with different ethnic groups that many should be aware of.

We hear a lot about ‘race’ these days, generally in cases of biased, activism, discrimination and so on. Personally, I do not like using the term race as it is inaccurate, misleading and often racist in its connotation. We are all ONE race – the human race!

In 1995, Robert Lee Hotz, reported in the Feb. 20 issue of the Cincinnati Enquirer:

“Researchers adept at analyzing the genetic threads of human diversity said Sunday that the concept of race – the source of abiding cultural and political divisions in American society – simply has no basis in fundamental human biology. Scientists should abandon it, they said.”

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“‘Biologically, we are saying in essence that race is no longer a valid scientific distinction,’ said Solomon H. Katz, a University of Pennsylvania anthropologist.”

Studies have linked certain ethnic groups of people to higher risks of developing heart disease and diabetes and suffering a stroke. Perhaps many racial activists should spend more time being concerned about their health risks than they are about non-existent racism. Just think about how money could be used to help conduct research to prevent these conditions that is being wasted on racial matters.

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